Archives For chalkboard paint

Kitchen Photographs

October 23, 2013 — 2 Comments

This is my kitchen as of September 2013, enjoy!
Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors Little House Design: Kitchen with black walls and cork floors

All photos are courtesy of Ashley a. Photography, thanks Ashley!

I really hate to break it to you but chalkboard paint is sort of a sham. Don’t get me wrong, I love the look and I don’t regret painting a chalkboard wall in my kitchen but it is only a “chalkboard” in the sense that IKEA furniture is “wood.” At least that is what I’ve been thinking since I painted it about six months ago (here).

Remember those green chalkboards from elementary school? I loved those. I especially liked it when my class job was to de-chalk the erasers which involved just going outside and banging them together so that the dust flew everywhere. There is no comparison between a real slate chalkboard and something painted with chalkboard paint, but I finally figured out a few tricks to make mine work better.

The problem I was having is that whenever I tried to erase a message it doesn’t really erase. See how you can still see my previous message underneath the current one?

Here is what it looks like after I tried to erase (with a dry paper towel):

Yeah not great. Because I’ve had this problem I’ve only changed the message like three times in the six months since I painted it. Frustrated by this I decided to actually spend 15 minutes and figure out what I was doing wrong and amazingly I did figure it out.
Here is out to properly use a chalkboard painted wall:
Prime it with chalk. When you first paint the wall the directions tell you to ‘prime’ it which basically entails rubbing a piece of chalk all over the wall. It seemed weird and pointless but I did it.
Side note: Chalk gets everywhere while doing this and I read somewhere that folding over a piece of painters tape will help catch some of the dust. It actually did help a little bit, but not a ton. 
 
What I did originally was prime the wall with chalk and then I completely wiped it off. That seemed like a reasonable thing to do, but it is the wrong thing to do. Instead of wiping the chalk off completely you just sort of rub it around until it’s smoky looking.
I also thought priming it was something you did once, but in order for it to work properly you should prime it whenever the wall looses this smoky look. If your wall looks smoky like this you can write and erase and write again and it works!
* So chalkboard paint actually does work… if you use it properly! Who knew?
Here is a side by side showing what to do and what not to do:

Also, if you ever do make yourself a chalkboard wall let me be the first to tell you that it is really hard to find chalk. I looked everywhere! I finally found colored chalk a few months ago, but I really wanted white so I kept looking. I finally found some last week so I was happy. I guess the best place would be to go to a teacher supply store or something but whose got time for that? I finally found some at Target which I’d looked at several times before but this time they actually had some in stock.
Also, I copy all my messages straight from the Pinterest ‘quotes’ category because I’m super original.
The end!

This happened.

Yep, I painted my kitchen black! I’m so in love with it.

It all started when I painted my back wall with chalkboard paint.

I loved the look but the rest of the room was still so… beige.

Then one day was thinking… what if I paint the whole kitchen black????

I was too nervous to do it with out seeing what it would look like first so I created a mock up.

Then I was convinced and just did it.

Here are a few shots from at night.

It isn’t too dark for me. There is only one lightbulb in there so it has never been super bright at night, but it doesn’t bother me.

Would you ever paint a room black? I’m so glad I went with my gut on this one.

Okay so chalkboards are everywhere these days and in my opinion they can go ‘cutesy’ really fast. For that reason I was never really into the trend. That is until I saw these images.

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Aren’t those amazing? These are clearly expensively designed rooms and they make chalkboard walls look textured and cool as opposed to kitschy and crafty. Inspired by these images I decided to do my own chalkboard wall.

I chose this wall in the back of my kitchen. It is by the basement door and the back door. I chose this wall because I can’t hang anything on it because of the electrical box. The box is non-functioning so it’s just there built into the wall with nothing to do.

I started by taping the whole area. I don’t normally tape everything when I paint but since it is such a small area I figured it would be easier. Plus I was about to use black paint so I knew mistakes would be harder to mask. I used black chalkboard paint from Valspar. It only came in quarts. I asked the worker how much wall space a quart could do and she said a 10’x10′ area. This wall is about 3’x8′ so I only got one. It was $19.98. I used a 3″ paint brush to do the whole thing because I didn’t want to break out a roller for such a small space. I did two coats and used less than half of the quart. I let it dry over night and then I took the tape off. I was dismayed to find that some of the black paint had leaked through in places.

I knew this would really bug me so I got out a small artist paint brush (about 1/2″) and touched up the paint with the leftover kitchen paint and some white semi-gloss paint I had on hand. So much better!

The paint is still wet in the first image, it has since dried and blends in perfectly. So after I did that little correction I primed the whole wall with chalk. I don’t really know why you have to do this but I did it.

Again, I’m not sure of the purpose of this but I love how it looks after it’s all been wiped off.

I had a little trouble capturing the affect on camera, but I am seriously happy with the result. It gives my kitchen something interesting to break up all the beige and white. It was such an easy and relatively cheap project since I only had to buy the paint. I’m so happy I changed my mind about this trend.